SEI – Work in Osaka Japan – from Spain

travelife japan

Meet Sei, a vibrant Spanish translator thriving in Osaka, Japan. From childhood fascination with manga to pursuing Japanese studies, Sei’s journey led to embracing Osaka’s vibrant culture. From Honmachi’s curry delights to Sumiyoshi Shrine’s tranquility, Sei’s zest for discovery ignites joy. Dreaming of a cozy home in Japan, Sei’s message resonates: Embrace every moment with curiosity and positivity in Japan!

Interview – Story in Japan

WHERE ARE YOU FROM?

Spain

WHAT DO YOU DO IN JAPAN?

I am a translator.

WHY ARE YOU INTERESTED IN JAPAN?

Since I was a kid, I started to be interested in manga/anime/video games and Japan. I started to study Japanese in a school in my home country, then I chose Japanese (Asian studies) as my major at the University of my home country. Little by little, I got more and more interested in Japan, Japanese, and its culture, then after I graduated, I moved to Japan as fast as possible.

WHY DID YOU CHOOSE TO STAY IN THIS CITY?

Currently, I am living in Osaka city. Since 2015 I lived for some years in Hiroshima city, and then in 2018, I moved to Osaka city. Hiroshima was a really nice place to start my journey in Japan. Hiroshima has a lot of warm people to talk, while you can study or work in such a peaceful atmosphere. After some years, I moved to Osaka because I found a chance to work in an international atmosphere. Also, since long ago I loved Osaka and specially, the Kansai area. So I think I had good luck to have a chance to move to the heart of Japan.

WHERE IS YOUR LOCAL RECOMMENDATION IN THIS CITY?

I love many areas of Osaka city. I love searching and discovering new and traditional places (restaurants, coffee shops with Showa atmosphere, peaceful places, traditional places, etc.)

For now, my top 3 places would be:

  • Honmachi area 🍱: It’s a business area, but you can find curious lunch/dinner spots. Specially, there are a lot of curry restaurants there.
  • Sumiyoshi shrine ⛩️: Peaceful place with historical structures to see and explore.
  • Universal Studios Japan 🎡: I love amusement parks, so this one must be on my top.
WHAT DID YOU ENJOY THE MOST WHILE STAYING ABROAD?

Searching amazing & local spots, experience, and taking pictures. While that, I enjoy learning new things every day about Japan or Japanese culture or language. Every day, I learn something new. Also, I am very grateful to have attended the events in Japan that I could not go to, or I wouldn’t have had a chance to attend if I had stayed in my home country.

DID YOU EXPERIENCE ANY CHANGE IN YOUR LIFE AND FUTURE PROSPECTS AFTER YOU START YOUR JOURNEY?

Yes. After moving to Japan, my life changed completely. I’ve become patient, more self-confident, and a hard worker. Also, I’ve learned how to appreciate a different country and culture while I keep my roots.

WHAT IS YOUR DREAM?

I have strong dreams related to Japan.

  • I would like to buy a house in Japan.
  • I would like to share my experiences in Japan, discovering interesting places and learning more new things day by day.
  • I would like to live happily in Japan.
MESSAGE TO OUR FRIENDS WHO WILL GO TO JAPAN.

It’s a unique experience. There will be easy and hard moments for sure, but do not be afraid to experience, try hard, and keep curious. I recommend you keep a positive, open mind and be proactive always. The best medicine to deal with people.

HOW DO YOU LEARN JAPANESE?

I’ve learned Japanese in many ways. One of the best ways is talking to locals. Listening and speaking Japanese will definitely help you to improve your skills. Please do not forget, that kanji is also important to study and learn. Also, I recommend finding a hobby. (For example, in my case: I love video games, visual kei concerts, reading, watching anime or movies, keeping an interest in what’s going on in Japan, Japanese tea, cats, etc.) and interact with people with the same interest in Japanese. Searching about your hobby in Japan and in Japanese will absolutely help you to improve your communication.

Recommendation

Sumiyoshi Taisha

Sumiyoshi Taisha, also known as Sumiyoshi Grand Shrine, is one of Japan’s oldest Shinto shrines, located in Osaka. Founded in the 3rd century, it is dedicated to the Sumiyoshi Sanjin, three gods that protect travelers, fishermen, and sailors, embodying the indigenous faith before Buddhism’s introduction to Japan. This shrine is renowned for its unique Sumiyoshi-zukuri architectural style, characterized by straight roofs and no curvature, reflecting an ancient, purely Japanese design. The shrine complex is a peaceful haven, featuring several bridges, including the iconic Taiko-bashi (drum bridge), and tranquil gardens. Sumiyoshi Taisha is a significant cultural and spiritual site, attracting visitors for New Year’s prayers, festivals, and to experience a part of Japan’s rich Shinto heritage.

Universal Studio Japan

Sumiyoshi Taisha, also known as Sumiyoshi Grand Shrine, is one of Japan’s oldest Shinto shrines, located in Osaka. Founded in the 3rd century, it is dedicated to the Sumiyoshi Sanjin, three gods that protect travelers, fishermen, and sailors, embodying the indigenous faith before Buddhism’s introduction to Japan. This shrine is renowned for its unique Sumiyoshi-zukuri architectural style, characterized by straight roofs and no curvature, reflecting an ancient, purely Japanese design. The shrine complex is a peaceful haven, featuring several bridges, including the iconic Taiko-bashi (drum bridge), and tranquil gardens. Sumiyoshi Taisha is a significant cultural and spiritual site, attracting visitors for New Year’s prayers, festivals, and to experience a part of Japan’s rich Shinto heritage.


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